Category: SGIFF 2017

Preview: Singapore International Film Festival 2018 – Let The Magic In

The annual Singapore International Film Festival (SGIFF) makes its return this November for its 29th Edition. Taking place for 12 days from 28th November to 9th December, the festival continues to promote cinema’s latest and best new works to the screen, celebrate Asian storytellers and bring these to the attention of an international audience. 103

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Review: Oh Lucy! dir. Atsuko Hirayanagi (SGIFF 2017)

Oh Lucy! is a road trip film with an improbable premise – middle-aged office worker Setsuko (Shinobu Terajima) agrees to her niece Mika’s (Shioli Kutsuna) request to take over her position at an English class, only to fall in love with the charming American English teacher John’s (Josh Hartnett) unconventional methods. But her happiness is short-lived

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Artist Spotlight: An Interview with the Cast and Creatives Behind Oh Lucy!

At the 28th Singapore International Film Festival, we got a chance to speak to the director and cast of the final Special Presentation film of the festival: Oh Lucy! At the In Conversation session hosted by moderator Anita Kapoor, who asked some truly brilliant questions, we were privy to some of director Atsuko Hirayanagi and cast

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Review: The White Girl dir. Jenny Suen and Christopher Doyle (SGIFF 2017)

There’s a cheesy quote that goes along the lines of ‘to know what someone fears losing, watch what they photograph.’ It’s not always accurate, but in the case of Jenny Suen’s directorial debut (co-directed with cinematographer legend Christopher Doyle), it’s a phrase that echoes throughout the film more than ever. The White Girl is a

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Artist Spotlight: Jenny Suen, Co-Director of The White Girl (SGIFF 2017)

Hong Kong filmmaker Jenny Suen has a strange relationship with her home country. Like many artists, she felt stifled growing up in the congested, business-centric city and wanted out. But upon moving to America for her studies, she felt a sudden pang of homesickness, and when she watched Wong Kar Wai’s In The Mood For Love for

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SGIFF 2017: Getting to Know the Youth Jury and Critics

At the 28th Singapore International Film Festival, the Youth Jury and Critics Programme makes a welcome return, with the aim of nurturing a new generation of young critics from the region. Since October, the thirteen participants have been meeting every Saturday to attend lectures from various personalities in the industry, ranging from TV presenters like

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Artist Spotlight: An Interview with Anup Singh, Director of The Song of Scorpions (SGIFF 2017)

In 2001, Geneva-based, Tanzanian-born director Anup Singh made waves around the film festival circuit with his debut feature film The Name of a River. His exploration of Indian culture and mythology through oneiric cinematography and mythic narratives continued in his sophomore feature Qissa: The Tale of a Lonely Ghost in 2013 and marked his first collaboration

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Artist Spotlight: An Interview with Kan Lumé, Co-director of hUSh (SGIFF 2017)

  Kan Lumé is an award-winning director and filmmaker based in Singapore. Over the years, he’s worked on various television programmes for Mediacorp, before making his mark as a rising star in the new generation of filmmakers. Kan’s feature films have picked up multiple awards and accolades, including the Best Newcomer Award at the Torino

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Artist Spotlight: An Interview with Xu Bing, Director of Dragonfly Eyes (SGIFF 2017)

Chinese visual artist Xu Bing is primarily an installation based artist. But in 2017, he made his film directorial debut with Dragonfly Eyes, snagging the FIPRESCI Prize and Special Mention: Ecumenical Jury at the Locarno International Film Festival 2017. Dragonfly Eyes continues Xu’s ongoing exploration of communication and the way we interact, carefully editing down over 11,000 hours of

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Artist Spotlight: Vivian Qu, Director of SGIFF 2017 Opening Film Angels Wear White

Vivian Qu has plenty of producing credits to her name and is a star in the Chinese independent film community, having produced arthouse films such as Knitting (2008), Night Train (2007) and Black Coal, Thin Ice (2014). But besides producing, the Chinese filmmaker also has a firm hand on creating her own works,  having scripted and directed her critically acclaimed debut Trap Street in 2013

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